what your coral needs

To help maintain the best health and color of your corals, we have broken down their lighting, current flow, feeding needs, expected growth rate, and their difficulty to maintain in a reef tank. Also included is additional helpful information about how to successfully keep these animals over the long haul. The information presented here has been translated from its original German and other sources. All information presented is based on the experience of the original authors and may not be yours. It is presented as a simplified information source on commonly found corals in reefkeeping and marine aquariums to help new reefkeepers and aquarists learn and become successful.

KEY to CORAL NEEDS TABLE
(hover over individual key listing to view explanation)
CORAL TYPES

LIGHTING

CURRENT

AGGRESSION

GROWTH

FEEDING

DIFFICULTY

SPS: Small Polyp Stony
LPS: Large Polyp Stony
NPS: Non Photosynthetic
SC: Soft Corals
P: Polyps
HC:Hydrocorals
Zoa: Zoanthids
L1: Low C1: Slow A1: None G1: Very Slow F1: Micro D1: Novice
L2: Low to Moderate C2: Slow to Medium A2: Low G2: Slow F2: Tiny D2: Easy
L3: Moderate C3: Medium A3: Moderate G3: Medium F3: Very Small D3: Moderate
L4: Moderate to High C4: Medium to Strong A4: Moderate to High G4: Fast F4: Small D: Difficult
L5: High C5: Strong A5: High G5: Very Fast F5: Meaty D5: Expert
NEEDS by CORAL TYPE A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Scientific and Common Names Type Light Current Aggression Growth Food Difficulty
Acanthastrea Acans, Lords, Lordhowensis LPS L3 C2 A3 G2 F2, F4 D2
Notes: Place on bottom. Are voracious nocturnal predators, watch placement and distance between colonies
Acropora Acro species, Super Colored Coral SPS L4 C4 A1 G4 F2 D4
Notes: SPS. Pulsing or varying currents ideal. Several species of fish are known to consume or nip at polyps. Subject to infestation by Acro eating flatworms and Tegastes Acroporanus (Red Bugs). Acropora and Montipora corals make up one-third of all reef building coral species.
Actinodiscus Mushroom Coral SC L1 C2 A1 G2 F1 D1
Notes: Does not like or need high levels of light
Agaricia Tan Lettuce-Leaf Coral SPS L2 C4 A1 G2 F1 D4
Notes: Agaricia is a protected coral and one cannot make legal collections of wild specimens. Place in lower to middle sections of the tank, depending on light intensity.
Alcyonium Finger Leather, Colt, Seaman’s, Dead Man’s Fingers, or Encrusting Leather Coral SC L3 C2 A1 G3 F1, F2 D1
Notes: Most species are tropical but some are cold water and would require a chiller. Some species observed as photosynthetic only.
Alveopora Flowerpot, Daisy or Ball Coral LPS L3 C2 A3 G2 F1, F4 D3
Notes: Place in lower to middle sections of the tank, depending on light intensity. May benefit from supplemental feeding with additional meaty and nutritious foods. Very delicate, most don’t survive in aquaria.
Anchor Coral Hammer Coral LPS L3 C3 A5 G4 F2 D3
Notes: Polyps are visible throughout the day and night. Member of Euphyllia genus.
Anthelia Waving Hand or Glove Coral P L4 C4 A1 G3 F1 D1
Notes: A group of colonial animals having several individual polyps attached to a piece of solid substrate. Easily damaged by predatory animals and stinging corals.
Astreopora Star Coral SPS L4 C4 A1 G1 F1, F4 D3
Notes: Rare coral rarely seen in aquarium trade
Balanophyllia Cup Coral, Porous Cup Coral, Orange Coral NPS L1 C2 A3 G2 F4, F5 D4
Notes: Solitary polyps. It is a non-photosynthetic LPS coral, needs to be target fed daily. Place on bottom or in cave like structures in tank. Tentacles only extend under no or very low light. Strong skimmer is recommended to take care of the nutrient load added by their required feeding.
Scientific and Common Names Type Light Current Aggression Growth Food Difficulty
Blastomussa Blasto, wellsi, merletti LPS L2 C2 A1 G1 F4, F5 D2
Notes: Place on rock substrate where they do not get excessive light or water flow
Brain Corals Acanthastrea, Platygyra, Trachyphyllia LPS L3 C2 A2 G2 F2, F3, F4 D2
Notes: A common name used to describe several genera and a multitude of species with varying needs. Please see individual species listings for information.
Briareum Star, Starburst, Eight Tentacle, Mat or Daisy Polyps P L4 C4 A1 G5 F1, F2 D2
Notes: Will rapidly grow over adjacent rock work, coral, or aquarium glass
Bubble Coral Plerogyra spp, Pearl, Bubble, Grape, Octopus or Pointed Bladder Coral LPS L1 C2 A5 G4 F2, F3, F4 D2
Notes: Has long sweeper tentacles and will sting corals in close proximity. Benefits from feeding when tentacles out at least weekly. Take care to prevent the bubbles from getting punctured by skeleton.
Button Coral Scolymia sp, Donut, Artichoke or Disk Coral LPS L3 C4 A3 G3 F2 D3
Notes: A round, solitary coral, usually having a single central oral opening. Handle with care so skeleton does not damage the soft flesh. Feeding several times a week with HUFA-fortified feed aids in growth and coloring.
Capnella Kenya Tree, Taro Tree, Cauliflower Soft or Pineapple Tree Coral SC L4 C4 A3 G5 F1 D1
Notes: May be disturbed by presence of hard corals. Invasive in that it will grow quickly, covering the substrate and everything in its path.
Catalaphyllia Elegance, Ridge or Wonder Coral LPS L3 C2 A5 G2 F3, F4 D4
Notes: Bury the base in soft sand, away from rocks and other organisms. Do not place directly under metal halides.
Caulastrea Candy Cane Coral, Trumpet, Torch, Candy or Bullseye Coral LPS L3 C3 A1 G4 F2, F3 D2
Notes: Not recommended to place these corals on the substrate; Direct feed two to three times per week.
Cespitularia Blue Xenia P L3 C3 A1 G3 F1, F2 D3
Notes: Popular due to vibrant blue coloration.
Chalice Coral Echinophyllia sp, Plate, Scroll or Flat Lettuce Coral LPS L2 C2 A4 G2 F2 D3
Notes: Develops various color patterns. Grows well even with subdued light. Good water quality is very important for growth and health.
Scientific and Common Names Type Light Current Aggression Growth Food Difficulty
Cladiella Cauliflower Colt, Colt or Blushing Coral SC L4 C4 A4 G5 F1 D1
Notes: Anchor on a good foundation for it to grow well. Secretes mucous to clean its body, avoid keeping next to aggressive aquarium members to reduce mucous secretions; may release toxins that affect stony coral growth.
Clavularia Clove, Glove, Fern, Waving Hand, Eight Tentacleor Palm Tree Polyps P L3 C3 A3 G5 F1 D2
Notes: Invasive in that it will grow quickly, covering the substrate and everything in its path.
Cynarina Cat’s Eye, Button, Tooth, Teary Eye or Doughnut Coral LPS L3 C1 A1 G3 F1, F2, F3 D2
Notes: Place on bottom of your marine aquarium, on sand. Can be confused with iclose relative, Scolymia. Give adequate room as it can expand to twice its size.
Cyphastrea Lesser Knob Coral or Branching Coral LPS L3 C3 A4 G3 F1, F2, F3 D2
Notes: Feed at night when tentacles are out; does need distance between it and other corals.
Dendronephthya Carnation Tree Coral, Cauliflower Soft or Strawberry Soft Coral SC L1 C4 A1 G2 F1, F2 D5
Notes: Only expert aquarists should attempt to keep this coral in a well established aquarium.
Dendrophyllia Large Sun, Super Sun or Large Polyp Sun Coral; Dendros LPS C4 A1 G3 F2, F3, F4 D2
Notes: Is a non-photosynthetic species and trequires regular feeding. Extends during day. Requires an intermittent flow
pattern.
Diploastrea Moon, Closed or Dimple Brain Coral LPS L3 C3 A4 G2 F2 D3
Notes: Needs indirect, intermittent current. Direct feed two to three times per week. Give ample space to extend its sweeper tentacles that may sting nearby corals. Rarely found in the aquarium hobby. Resemble and are related to Favia and Favites.
Discosoma Bullseye Mushroom, Flower Coral, Mushroom or Disc Anemone SC L2 C2 A3 G4 F1, F2 D1
Notes: Bullseye Mushrooms breed easily and rapidly in a marine aquarium, propagating through longitudinal fission.
Distichopora Fire Coral, Lace Coral, Stylaster Coral HC C4 A1 G3 F2, F3, F4 D4
Notes: are azooxanthellate and not dependent on light. For a well established aquarium. Places itself upside down in caves or any overhangs. Requires an intermittent flow pattern.
Duncans Duncanopsammia LPS L1 C2 A1 G3 F4, F5 D2
Notes: In the Dendrophillia family but are photosynthetic. Prefers to attach to solid objects in soft, sandy areas, benefits from targeted feedings.
Scientific and Common Names Type Light Current Aggression Growth Food Difficulty
Echinophyllia Chalice, Plate, Scroll, Flat or Lettuce Coral LPS L2 C2 A4 G2 F2 D3
Notes: Develops various color patterns. Grows well even with subdued light. Good water quality is very important for growth and health. Capable of aggressive behavior by way of their sweeper tentacles,
Echinomorpha Chalice Coral (Echinomorpha nishihirai) LPS L4 C2 A5 G1 F2, F3 D3
Notes: distinguished by a prominent, large central corallite and very few (if any), widely spaced peripheral corallites. Tolerant to different light conditions but does best under brighter light. Should be considered an aggressive coral, capable of producing long sweeper tentacles like other members of Pectiniidae. Rarely seen in aquarium trade.
Echinopora Hedgehog Coral SPS L5 C5 A4 G3 F2, F3 D3
Notes: Requires a turbulent flow. Feed at least once a week. Does not do well in tanks with soft corals as they are very sensitive to the chemicals soft corals produce, even when not close to them. Often confused with Echinolyllia spp but belongs to Faviidae family.
Elegance Coral Catalaphyllia sp, Ridge or Wonder Coral LPS L3 C2 A5 G2 F3, F4 D4
Notes: Bury the base in soft sand, away from rocks and other organisms. Do not place directly under metal halides
Euphyllia Hammer, Torch, Frogspawn or Anchor Coral LPS L4 C2 A5 G4 F2 D3
Notes: Nettles strongly, keep sufficient distance to other corals. Should not be subjected to direct or heavy water flow as their sharp skeletons can cause tissue damage.
Favia Moon, Pineapple, Closed Brain or Brain Coral LPS L3 C3 A4 G2 F1, F2 D2
Notes: Direct feed two to three times per week. Favia is the largest genus of Faviidae having corallites with separate and distinct walls (plocoid) is what distinguishes it from Favites.
Favites Brain, Pineapple, Moon or Larger Star Coral LPS L3 C3 A4 G2 F1, F2 D2
Notes: Direct feed two to three times per week. A genus of Faviidae having the walls of the corallites shared or fused.
Frogspawn Wall, Octopus, Grape or Honey Coral LPS L4 C3 A5 G4 F2 D3
Notes: Nettles strongly, keep sufficient distance to other corals.
Fungia Disk, Plate or Tongue Coral LPS L3 C2 A2 G3 F2, F3 D1
Notes: Likes a sandy base. Excretes a heavy mucus coat containing toxin in response to contact. capable of movement and may move itself around a tank.
Galaxea Tooth, Star, Crystal, Starburst, Brittle or Galaxy Coral LPS L5 C3 A5 G3 F2, F3 D3
Notes: Combat tentacles nettle strongly. Extend less under good water flow but keep sufficient distance from other corals.
Goniastrea Goniastrea australensis, Honeycomb Coral, Closed Brain Coral LPS L4 C3 A3 G3 F1, F2 D3
Notes: Keep sufficient distance from other corals. Filter feeds a few times per week.
Scientific and Common Names Type Light Current Aggression Growth Food Difficulty
Gonipora Flowerpot, Daisy or Ball Coral LPS L5 C4 A5 G3 F1, F2 D4
Notes: Have 24 tentacle tips and their corallites have 24 septa; Alveopora corals have 12 each.
Gorgonia See Fans, Sea Spray, Sea Whips SC L1 C4 A2 G2 F2, F3 D4
Notes: Must be fed regularly with zooplankton and other similar sized foods. Need to be attached to the substrate and most require a brisk current. Easily over grown by algae. For the established tank and experienced reefkeeper. Illegal to harvest in many areas.
Hammer Coral Anchor Coral LPS L3 C3 A5 G4 F2 D3
Notes: Polyps are visible throughout the day and night. Member of Euphyllia genus.
Heliofungia Disk, Mushroom, Fungia Plate or Tongue Coral LPS L2 C3 A4 G2 F2, F3, F5 D2
Notes: Place directly on aquarium floor on sandy substrate. Is a solitary coral with long tentacles that can damage other corals. Will move around the tank. Genus contains long and short tentacle species. Feed several times a week. If wounded it means probable death for the coral.
Herpolitha Tongue, Slipper, Mole or Striate Boomerang Coral LPS L3 C2 A3 G2 F2, F3, F5 D3
Notes: Placed on a soft or rubble-covered bottom. Can move around. Has a prominent central groove down the middle, called an axial furrow. Largest of all the solitary corals. Similar in appearance to the Polyphyllia but has deeper central furrow and fewer tentacles.
Hydnophora Horn, Velvet Horn, Thorny or Knob Coral SPS L4 C4 A5 G4 F2 D3
Notes: Direct feed two to three times per week. Keep well away from other corals in the tank.
Kenya Tree Capnella sp, Taro Tree or Pineapple Tree Coral SC L4 C4 A3 G5 F1 D1
Notes: May be disturbed by presence of hard corals. Invasive in that it will grow quickly, covering the substrate and everything in its path.
Leather Coral Sarcophyton sp, Toad Stool SC L3 C4 A1 G3 F1, F2 D2
Notes: Feed phytoplankton several times a week.
Lemnalia Tree, Paralemnia, Finger Leather, Branch or Cauliflower Coral SC L4 C4 A4 G3 F1 D3
Notes: Feed three times per week with phytoplankton. Does give off chemical toxins to ward off encroaching corals
Lepastrea Crater Coral LPS L3 C3 A3 G3 F1 D2
Notes: Strongly fluorescent under actinic lighting.
Scientific and Common Names Type Light Current Aggression Growth Food Difficulty
Leptoseris Leaf coral, Lettuce Coral SPS L3 C4 A3 G3 F2 D4
Notes: Can benefit from feeding micro-plankton or baby brine shrimp
Lobophyllia Lobed, Colored, Carpet, Flat, Open Brain, Meat, Modern or Large Flower Coral LPS L4 C3 A3 G3 F2, F3 D2
Notes: Feed several times a week with fortified food.
Merulina Lettuce, Cabbage, Ridge, or Ruffled Coral SPS L4 C3 A1 G2 F2 D5
Notes: Direct feed two to three times per week. Difficult to care for. Do better in well-fed reef tanks
Micromussa Micro Coral LPS L2 C3 A2 G3 F2, F3 D4
Notes: A newer genus just described in the 1980’s
Millepora Fire, Stinging, Box, Bladed Fire, Wello Fire or Branching Fire Coral HC L5 C5 A5 G5 F1, F2, F3 D4
Notes: Have a potent sting and gloves need to be worn when handling! Are very aggressive and will grow toward, encrust, and take over other corals (especially Gorgonians). Keep at least 6″ from other corals and main rock formations. Needs turbid flow.
Montastraea Boulder or Star Boulder Coral LPS L3 C3 A4 G2 F2 D4
Notes: Tend to produce a lot of clear mucus.
Montipora Velvet Branch or Velvet Finger SPS L4 C4 A1 G4 F2 D3
Notes:
Dependent on good water values and sufficient calcium, carbonates, and magnesium but Is considered easiest of the SPS corals to care for. Once established, they are quite hardy and fast growing.
Acropora and Montipora corals make up one-third of all reef building coral species.
Moseleya no other names LPS L3 C2 A3 G2 F1, F2 D3
Notes: Each corallite is large and cup-shaped and will usually form around one central and larger corallite.
Mushrooms Actinodiscus, Discosoma, Ricordea SC L2 C2 A3 G4 F1, F2, F4 D1
Notes: Name often used for corals in these genus.
Mycedium Green Eyed Cup, Elephant Nose, Peacock or Chinese Lettuce Coral LPS L3 C3 A4 G2 F2 D4
Notes: Feeding several times a week with HUFA-fortified feed aids in growth and coloring. Should be placed or mounted vertically. Form long stinging sweeper tentacles at night so place away from other corals. Have the potential to release toxins into the water affecting neighboring corals and especially soft corals
Scientific and Common Names Type Light Current Aggression Growth Food Difficulty
Nemenzophyllia Fox, Jasmine, or Ridge Coral LPS L2 C1 A1 G3 F2 D2
Notes: Feed three times per week. A fleshy coral so make sure the colony is firmly secured into position to avoid damage from bumps or falls.
Neospongodes Green Carnation Tree SC L4 C4 A5 G3 F1, F2 D3
Notes: Color highly dependent upon lighting, the more intense the more yellow.
Nephthea Neon Green Palau Nephthea SC L3 C4 A1 G3 F1, F2 D1
Notes: Direct feed 2-3 times per week with phytoplankton.
Nephthyigorgia Chili, Strawberry, Chili Cactus, Red Chili, or Red Finger Soft Coral, Chili Sponge, and Devil’s Hand SC L1 C4 A1 G3 F1, F2 D3
Notes: Place underneath live rock overhangs. Feed three times per week.
Oulophyllia Deep Walled Maze Brain, or Closed Brain Coral LPS L4 C4 A3 M3 F2 D3
Notes: Similar to Platygyra species
Oxypora Chalice Coral LPS L2 C2 A4 G1 F2 D4
Notes: Feeding several times a week with HUFA-fortified feed aids in growth and coloring. like most members of the family Pectiniidae, possesses powerful sweeper tentacles.
Pachyclavularia Green Star, Starburst, Mat, Daisy, or Eight Tentacle polyps P L3 C4 A1 G5 F1 D1
Notes: Its encrusting growth pattern can cause it to rapidly encroach on rock work, aquarium glass, and coral neighbors.
Pachyseris Elephant Skin, Corduroy, or Castle Coral LPS L5 C5 A1 G2 F1, F2 D4
Notes: Does not have any visible polyps or tentacles. Requires the addition of calcium, strontium, and other trace elements to the water.
Palythoa Button or Moon Polyps, Sea Mat P L3 C4 A3 G5 F2, F3 D1
Notes: Place in an area where they will not encroach on nearby corals, especially stony corals
Scientific and Common Names Type Light Current Aggression Growth Food Difficulty
Parazoanthus Yellow Polyps Zoa L3 C2 A3 G3 F2 D2
Notes: Usually placed near the bottom of the tank. Occasional feeding of small meaty foods like brine shrimp is beneficial.
Pavona Maldive, Potato Chip, Encrusting Star or Leaf Coral SPS L4 C5 A3 G2 F2 D4
Notes: Pavona maldivensis is a unique species within the Pavona genus
Pectinia Spiny Cup Coral LPS L3 C3 A1 G2 F1, F2 D5
Notes: Benefits from supplemental zooplankton feedings.
Physogyra Bubble, Pearl, Pearl Bubble, Grape, Octopus, or Pointed Bladder Coral LPS L1 C2 A5 G4 F2, F3, F4 D2
Notes: Has long sweeper tentacles and will sting corals in close proximity. Benefits from feeding when tentacles out at least weekly. Take care to prevent the bubbles from getting punctured by skeleton. Leather corals emit a toxin that can harm them.
Plate Coral Fungia sp, Disk, Mushroom or Tongue
LPS L3 C2 A2 G2 F2, F3 D2
Notes: Likes a sandy base. Excretes a heavy mucus coat containing toxin in response to contact. capable of movement and may move itself around a tank.
Plerogyra Bubble, Pearl Bubble, or Pearl Coral LPS L1 C2 A5 G4 F2, F4, F5 D2
Notes: Has long sweeper tentacles and will sting corals in close proximity. Benefits from feeding when tentacles out at least weekly. Take care to prevent the bubbles from getting punctured by skeleton. Leather corals emit a toxin that can harm them.
Platygyra Brain Worm, Maze Brain, Brain, Closed Brain, or Bowl Coral LPS L3 C3 A3 G3 F2, F3, F5 D2
Notes: Susceptible to necrotic tissue loss from stress or bleaching
Pocillipora Cauliflower, Raspberry, Lace or Birdsnest Coral SPS L5 C5 A3 G3 F2, F3, F5 D3
Notes: Have short sweeper tentacles that will sting nearby corals. Can quickly encroach on nearby corals. Need a strong,
turbid water flow and dissolved nutrients
Porites Christmas Tree Worm Rock, Encrusting Boulder Coral SPS L5 C5 A1 G2 F1 D3
Notes: Christmas Tree Rock have symbiotic colorful Christmas Tree or Fan Worms that bore into their skeletons. Often shed outer surface layer to get rid of wastes and algae.
Protopalythoa Button Polyps, Sea Matt P L3 C4 A3 G5 F2, F3 D1
Notes: Polyps on the ends of stalks instead of embedded in the mat; most produce poison palytoxin
Scientific and Common Names Type Light Current Aggression Growth Food Difficulty
Psammocora Pillar, Green Stony Pillar , Branched Sandpaper or Dark Green Contigua Coral SPS L3 C4 A1 G3 F1 D2
Notes: Prefers full spectrum lighting. Due to peaceful nature position away from any aggressive corals.
Ricordea Mushroom, Ricordea Mushroom, False Coral, Corallimorpharian SC L2 C1 A3 G3 F1, F2, F4 D3
Notes: Common colors are green, tan, and brown. Adaptable to variety of lighting conditions but care required with metal halide lighting.
Rhodactis Elephant Ear, Giant Anemone, Hairy, or Lavender Mushroom, Disc Anemone SC L2 C2 A3 G3 F1, F2 D1
Notes: Commonly seen in brown, tan, and green. Easily reproduces by fission or laceration. Can harm sessile invertebrates and overgrow other inhabitants of the reef.
Sarcophyton Leather Coral, Toad Stool SC L3 C4 A1 G3 F1, F2 D1
Notes: Feed phytoplankton several times a week.
Scolymia Button, Donut, Artichoke or Disk Coral LPS L3 C4 A3 G3 F2 D3
Notes: A round, solitary coral, usually having a single central oral opening. Handle with care so skeleton does not damage the soft flesh. Feeding several times a week with HUFA-fortified food aids in growth and coloring.
Seriatopora Birds Nest, Needle, or Brush Coral SPS L5 C5 A1 G5 F2 D4
Notes: Color and shape vary, depending on the conditions under which the colony was grown. Dependent on very good water quality and sufficient calcium, carbonates, and magnesium to maintain growth.
Siderastrea Starlet, Lesser Starlet, Round Starlet or Pink Starlet Coral SC L3 C3 A2 G4 F1, F2 D3
Notes: Rare to find offered for sale in the aquarium trade.
Sinularia Finger Leather, Spaghetti Leather Coral SC L4 C3 A3 G4 F1, F2 D1
Notes: Can grow quickly and may overcome some less aggressive colonies and can release chemicals into the water in their competition for space. Can benefit from additional food for filter feeding invertebrates.
Stereonephthya Red Tip Tree, Cauliflower, or Strawberry Tree Coral SC L3 C4 A1 G3 F2, F3 D3
Notes: Found in a variety of colors with red, purple or orange the most common.
Stylaster HC HC C5 A3 G3 F1, F2 D5
Notes: Are deep water species and need cooler tanks, dim lighting, and regular micro-plankton feeding. Do not have the potent sting of close relative, the Millepora Fire Coral.
Scientific and Common Names Type Light Current Aggression Growth Food Difficulty
Stylocoeniella Thorn Coral SPS L4 C3 A2 G4 F1, F2 D3
Notes: Generally unknown in reef aquaria, encrusting.
Stylophora Cat’s Paw or Club Finger Coral SPS L5 C5 A3 G4 F2 D4
Notes: Dependent on very good water quality and sufficient calcium, carbonates, and magnesium to maintain growth.
Sun Coral Tubastrea sp, Tube Coral LPS L1 C3 A1 G3 F2, F3 D5
Notes: One of a few corals that does not contain a symbiotic algae. Requires feeding several times a week with HUFA-fortified feed from an eye dropper directly to each one of its polyps. Can be quite fragile and must be handled with extra care
Symphyllia Dented Brain Coral LPS L3 C2 A3 G3 F2, F3 D3
Notes: Feeding several times a week with HUFA-fortified feed aids in growth and coloring. Can expand in size and should be secured firmly in place to prevent toppling.
Toad Stool Sarcophyton sp, Leather Coral SC L3 C4 A1 G3 F1, F2 D2
Notes: Feed phytoplankton several times a week.
Torch Coral Trumpet or Pom Pom Coral LPS L3 C3 A5 G3 F2, F3 D3
Notes: Sweeper tentacles can extend out several inches from its base and sting other coral species. Member of Euphyllia genus
Trachyphyllia Folded Brain or Crater Coral, Trachs or Trachys LPS L3 C3 A3 G3 F2, F3 D3
Notes: Placing in the aquarium so that nothing will damage the soft tissue, bottom of tank on sandy substrate ideal. Fluoresce brightly under actinic lighting.
Tubastrea Tube Coral, Sun Coral LPS L1 C3 A1 G3 F2, F3 D4
Notes: One of a few corals that does not contain a symbiotic algae. Requires feeding several times a week with HUFA-fortified food from an eye dropper directly to each one of its polyps. Can be quite fragile and must be handled with extra care
Turbinaria Cup, Scroll, Vase or Bowl Coral SPS L3 C3 A1 G3 F2, F5 D2
Notes: Position so as not to collect debris on the surface. Will feed on meaty foods.
Wellsophyllia Pacific Rose, Flat Brain, Open Brain, Welso LPS L3 C3 A3 G3 F2, F3 D3
Notes: Placing in the aquarium so that nothing will damage the soft tissue, bottom of tank on sandy substrate is ideal. Their irregular round shape, deep valleys, fused walls with numerous folds originally identified Wellsophyllia corals as separate from Trachyphyllia corals. Now referred to as Trachyphyllia radiata
Scientific and Common Names Type Light Current Aggression Growth Food Difficulty
Xenia Pulse Corals SC L3 C3 A1 G5 F1 D1
Notes: Can quickly overgrow an area. Needs organics in the the water column from either fish or a mature sand bed. Smells bad when removed from the water
Zoanthid Zoas, Button or Stick Polyps, Sea Mats, Colonial Anemones Zoa L4 C2 A3 G4 F2, F3 D1
Notes: Very good for beginners. Zoanthid is basically a catch-all term used for all cnidarians in the order Zoantharia

Sources Materials From:
Marine Direct (German)
Animal World Marine and Reef Aquarium References
Coral Finder A-Z
Reefs.org

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